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Dear Men: Stop Disrespecting Women Photographers in the Field

24 thoughts on Dear Men: Stop Disrespecting Women Photographers in the Field

  1. Emma, you are not breaking ground in photography. Dorothea Lange did that. Mary Ellen Mark did that. Annie Leibovitz did that. It’s time for you to recognize the difference between professionalism and amateurism. Amateurs will always question your equipment and technical choices. Professionals don’t give a crap, unless you impact them by acting like an amateur. Don’t get in someone else’s way and be respectful of fellow professionals. It’s that simple. Do your job, quit whining and be grateful to the women who preceded you. If you can’t handle the perceived slights, you need to find another profession.

  2. Dear female clients

    Please stop avoiding hiring my services for weddings; children’s portraits and maternity/newborn sessions because I’m a man and as a man won’t pay enough attention to detail or

    Have that “mothers eye” for the shot you want.

    See how that works?

  3. This article is kinda dumb…males do that to other males all the same

    It’s doesn’t matter if you are male or female,…people love to brag, people love to show their knowledge (or lack thereof) when a bird of similar feathers is nearby, a “big camera” always elicits random, dumb comments no matter who is holding it

    Regardless of your gender, you just need to carry yourself like you own the place or stay quiet and don’t engage,…welcome to basic social skills regardless of industry, profession, or sex

  4. It’s the other way around here in BC. The times I’ve had weddings ruined is by female “photographers” constantly disrespecting me and not co operating. If they’re part of the bridal party they’ll really go out of their way to make my life hell.

    This article is good old fashioned sexism. Photographers sometimes disrespect other photographers. Making it a gender debate is separating men and women as genders, and flies in the face of everything feminism stands for.

  5. I am a black (male) photographer who shares your sentiments. Amazed at the “photographers” who show up at small venues with their phallic lenses. Amazed at the instantaneous, automatic presumption of superiority. Tips, suggestions, condescending remarks. But I’ve found the same behavior from these people no matter what the circumstances. They carry it with them no matter where they are or what they are doing. It’s how they were raised, I guess.

  6. I really thought most men here would do thumbs up and go “Great article! We’ll support you!” But no. The “not all men” and butthurt men in general apparently carries cameras too.

    Some of the greatest photographers I know are women and I’m privileged to know them.

    Let’s treat each other with the respect & courtesy we’d like to get ourself.

    And no, she didn’t even write “all men”, so relax.

  7. News flash! This has nothing to do with you being a woman. Your insecurity about your own gender is the only issue here. Males treat other males the exact same and “le gasp” as a male photographer I’ve been treated this way by females!!! I know, impossible, cus females are flawless. It’s called competition, posturing, asserting your place of tenure. It’s called being confident and to a point arrogant which is almost required at a venue where you are one of 1000 people doing the exact same thing as you. Spend less time whining and more time shooting and you’ll have all the proof of self you need. If you can’t take “particularly older” COMPETITORS, that’s right the other photog isn’t your friend they are your competition, being well competitive, you should probably get out of the field and go teach yearbook some where.

  8. To all the men commenting on this post, please just take a minute to realize that you are in a position of privilege and you have never had the experiences described here. Instead of writing it off immediately, just read it, take some time to consider that you might be a part of the problem, and try to think about fixing it. Just because you haven’t seen it personally doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.

  9. ALL THE TIME. I have male family members come up to me during wedding receptions and try to give me tips. I’ve had men tell me several times that it’s great that my little business is a good way for me to “help with the bills”. Excuse me? This is a career, just like my husband’s job.

  10. Somebody needs to suck it up and get on with it….To me this is just the way some photographers treat other photographers in the field. In photogojournalism there is a real Wolf Pack mentality and has been that way forever….That does not make it right, I don’t take that approach, just the way it is.

  11. Womansplaining at its finest. As a gay male I am sorry you allow other man to talk down to you this way. I have had other males do similar things during HS sports since I look like a 12 year old. However I LOL in their face and think nothing of it. Honestly we all know what trolls are, and female or male it will also happen, haters will never go away, part of being a creative is working though the crap like this and perseverance. Do you stop making photos or videos because 5 people left a negative comment on FB or youtube? NOPE! You keep going.

    I would be curious as to what type of events she shoots to experience this as I shoot with several woman and we are good friends and it has never been brought up in conversation. However I will have to ask now as they are not the type of woman that would allow or tolerate such behavior.

    It also depends on how you carry yourself, how many times have we all seen a clueless photographer with more camera gear then they can handle? and create poor images with 10K in gear. All. Day. Long. Female or Male or gender queer.

  12. “But the patronization is not always so blatant. What initially inspired my recent FB post was a photographer I encountered at a local Ferris wheel I was planning to shoot. The guy began showing me his photos on his phone, talking about his work, and giving me his suggestions for my shots. Never once did he ask to see my work or ask what I was doing there.”

    Oh please, quit you’re whining. Welcome to being a photographer and meeting the “uncles at the wedding.” This happens to all of us. Period.

    For the record my visual mentors in my career include Susan Meiselas, Mary Ellen Mark, Diane Arbus, Margaret Bourke-White, Anne Geddes, shall I continue?

    A great wiki-link for women photographers is at:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_women_photographers

    Oh, and by the way…as a pool shooter the toughest player who ever kicked my butt all over the table is a woman. 🙂 She was a great league-mate.

  13. I am an Asian male living in a Western country who grew up idolizing photographers like Annie Leibovitz.

    I can’t speak for other men, but it sounds like the author is taking her insecurities and allowing herself to assume the absolute worst in everyone.

  14. If this were the other way around, automatically calling out most women for wrong doing, you’d have an issue on your hands, but it’s OK to constantly imply most men are wrongdoers.

    Seriously, this PC has to stop.
    It’s not male photographers, it’s some photographers.

    Don’t produce such current overly PC BS Petapixel, stick to photography.

  15. I never realized that there was such a thing as man/woman photographer ! I always thought that photography is just capturing what you see, the way you see it…. my 2 cents….

  16. Another time I was photographing a 3 story inflatable duck coming into harbor in Long Beach California. Everyone and their mom was there who owned a camera. I jockeyed for a prime position near an elderly man and said hi and asked about the doohikie on his viewfinder. I may as well have asked if we had landed on the moon.But he was stuck with me and I wore him down!!

  17. BOOOOHOOOO…It happens to everyone. I’ve seen more gay photographers insult models and other people in public than anyone else. But im not crying about it, and mean no offense, but thats the truth of the fashion world, its run by bitchy queens lol. Guys get harassed just as much by photography reps and are verbally solicited sex. Its not a one way street anymore. Grow thick skin, or stay inside.

  18. I would suggest that all our women photographers look up the career of Louise Serpa, the first female photographer to shoot in the PRCA as well as the Grand National Horse race in Ireland. She continues to be a mentor to me, and never let herself be intimidated by others. https://youtu.be/Nhf5_nlVAKQ

  19. Never had this problem……i treat other photographer’s with respect……i focus on my work and appreciate others work as well and learn from it as well. I try to let my images speak for themselves and keep personalities out of the mix……cuz there is always someone who can afford a bigger lens

  20. Thats actually NOT a thing …at least here in Germany ! And also very stupid because woman got more emotional experienve than man so its easier to trigger kreativity

  21. None of what she described is “disrespecting” her because she’s a woman. I’ve encountered Pros working for media outlets have been a bit snotty because they think I’m a dedicated amateur type who wants to be pro (I’m a pro who works in a specific field – just not journalism). It’s a nasty head game I’ve encountered in other competitive fields. As far as talking about their own stuff without showing interest in her work, that’s not because she’s a woman, it’s because she’s so self centered she doesn’t realize everyone else is self centered too. Lots of people like to show off their work to real pros and get feedback and are completely disinterested in other people’s work. And lastly (and this ties into the last) – photographers and especially non pro entheuiast photographers aren’t known for their smooth social skills. I’ve talked to lots and a fair amount are a bit off (I certainly am when working as I’m mentally focused on shooting instead of normal socializing). There’s a connection between the media and the media creator here. Photographers are often psychologically “outside” observers who even dislike having their own photo taken. Serious working female photogs I’ve encountered are often a bit similar (never
    Nearly as bad as men) in that they are often not often extroverts or highly social people.

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