Photographers Upset by ‘Ask First’ Stickers at BDSM Folsom Street Fair

25 thoughts on Photographers Upset by ‘Ask First’ Stickers at BDSM Folsom Street Fair

  1. What the crap? A public space is a public space. Not your private gathering. If you don’t want to be embarrassed because you were running around naked, then maybe you shouldn’t be running around naked. Oh and by the way “up skirt” shots and rape are crimes, not photography. Your attempt to.conflate the two to usurp other people’s rights is childish and pathetic.

    I see anybody with these stickers, I’m going to burn up a whole card just on you.

  2. To expect people to not take photos without asking is very lofty, but its an understandable request. Photographers can be a very entitled bunch, and the guy in this article is a very good example. Just because you want to photograph something and have the legal right to do so, doesn’t mean that you should ignore how the subject feels. Be a decent human being first and a photographer second.

  3. “Look but don’t touch” is the basic principle we all work on in public. People can look at other people as they want, but touching others without consent is illegal.

    Photography had always been seen as an extension of looking. It’s legal except for a few minor situations like upskirt (where I dare say looking is probably also illegal if intentional).

    My concern with this and other similar attitudes towards photography is they are trying to reframe photography from the “look” debate into the “touch” debate. That’s a dangerous slippery slope to head down.

  4. I disagree greatly. The intent of the photograph should be in question, not the space in which it is taken. Public space is a public space and as a journalist, I believe completely in the right to capture content for editorial and commercial purposes. If you don’t like the law, change it…but don’t make up your own.

  5. If you don’t want your picture taken and I take it come and tell me and I will gladly delete it, wow I can only imagine shooting at a sporting event and asking the crowd for permission, I will be there my entire life asking 50,000 people if I can take their picture. Please give me a break

  6. What people don’t get is that abusing a freedom only ends up losing it.. Special with photography which is so sensitive and still outdated. Laws apply to an age that photography was a rare thing and the photos themselves not that easy to been published.. Now days things are completely different.. Let’s just wait for the first state or country that will ban “street” photography..

  7. Tricky issue, not really sure where I fall on it. If I am in public doing photography on the street or at a public event I definitely feel like asking first would sort of ruin the natural moment I am trying to capture. As soon as someone is posing it definitely takes away from the photo, for me at least. My policy is usually just to shoot and try not to linger on one person for too long. If I notice someone getting uncomfortable or if they make a comment I will usually approach them and explain why I am shooting or why I thought they would be an interesting subject for a photo and explain that I will be happy to delete the images if they are uncomfortable. Just don’t be a jerk and don’t make people feel uncomfortable, pretty simple. As much as I think photographers have the right to shoot in public I also think anyone has a right to ask me to stop shooting them.

  8. Interesting idea

    Does anyone have any ‘I don’t want to see you seminaked’ or ‘you’re not as attractive as you think you are’ stickers to hand out to people ??

  9. I don’t think there’s a legal argument here, its strictly moral/ethical/whatever.

    Of course, its no different than all the rich companies moving their headquarters to ireland and not paying their full share of taxes in their own country. perfectly legal, doesn’t matter what effects it has on anything/anyone else other than the bottom line.

    No different than companies being able to null and void warranties/promises/etc because you didn’t dot an ‘I’ according to the EULA you agreed to be default as soon as you opened their product.

  10. Think it really depends on the event and the photographer. If the shot is meant to be a candid and the photographer seems approachable and can follow up with not being a creep then it works. There are instances where I’ll wave the camera in sight to gain a posed photo as my way of “asking”.

  11. This is really funny…only applies when it’s convenient, yet most of these people will pull out there cell phone and start clicking and video taping instead of helping if an incident happens. Photojournalism would not exist if you had to ask.

  12. Getting consent from all those people in the background of a shot is going to be hard.

    Thankfully with facial recognition technology you can find out who each of the hundreds of people you capture might be!

    Then it’s as easy as compiling a spreadsheet and spending days trawling through FB and such like looking for contact details for each one.

    Then it’s just a case of sending off emails or making calls to everyone who might have inadvertently wandered into your shot. 😉

  13. If you are parading in public, you are fair game!!! While it might be polite to ask, that is up to the photographer. Should the photographer be required to ask to take the picture of the Charlotte BLM rioters? How about the BDSM crowd asking the people on the street if it’s OK for them to do their thing in front of the people there or the kids that might be present? Does politeness only work one way?

  14. I suppose it’s a matter of manners to ask before you take a picture but if you’re really worried about your job, walking around in public in assless chaps and a ball gag in your mouth might not be such a great idea.

  15. To put this all in perspective, the “photographer” was ranting about just seeing some stickers. According to the article, he had no interactions with anyone. He saw a sticker merely suggesting the person would like to consent to being photographed and he got all upset and took to social media to have his little name calling temper tantrum. Also, the ask first campaign is about touching and/or engaging someone, there is no mention of photography at all. This is pure speculation but I bet what happened is he got all in someone’s face with a camera, they mentioned the sticker meant they’d like to be asked to be engaged with and he went off like a little baby.

  16. I’m still trying to figure out the public space in which this woman “found herself being groped and prodded by complete strangers who definitely didn’t have permission to do any of those things”–and nobody got arrested for sexual assault.

  17. What about abuse of public spaces to turn them into private space for a few…. A public space is a public space is a public space. Period. People who want annonimity should not go to non private places. And if someone willingly participate in a public event then clearly they are choosing to get identified with that event…. So it shouldn’t matter how far the image will travel… This is simply an excuse to harass photographers….

  18. Seems to me that these people want their cake and be able to eat it. Why have this or anything like it, in a public space? Because, they want the publicity, attention, visibility, whatever…you can’t have that and at the same time, work to limit other people’s freedoms which are based upon exactly the rules which are enabling you to have your fair/march/gathering, etc.

  19. So many typos in the article, I gave up.

    But if you’re worried your conservative friends are going to see you become internet famous for being dressed provocatively in public, don’t dress provocatively in public. Or get new friends.

  20. Over the last couple years I’ve had a chance to spend some time abroad. Most recently several weeks in Thailand. What it made me realize are wonderful things vs “not ideal” of the States.

    One key thing was the selfishness and poor manners of Americans. This of course does not apply to all but there’s for sure a “me and my point of view which will be defended till the end” mentality that I don’t think I really ever saw until comparing with other cultures that don’t lead such entitled lifestyles.

    Instead of just saying that we’d honor a non legal request for no reason other than to make someone else feel comfortable, we say things like “oh well maybe they shouldn’t parade down the street in chaps”…or “Well if they have the right, then we have the right”. It’s this “legal anger” that we have which we use to flip the conversation to make it only about our point or to dismiss someone else’s.

    It’s odd to come back and see such poignant arguments about a sticker which is making a request for a festival. It’s just that…a request. Frankly there are better things out there to worry about and fight for. You’re absolutely welcome to ignore that request and to know that deep down, legally you’re right.

  21. Isn’t it against the rule of photojournalism that a photo shouldn’t be posed or staged? Street photography and permissions don’t go hand in hand. The rate at which these butt hurt idiots are growing, I believe we’re seeing the final years of street photography.

  22. People who complain they can’t get candid shot if they need to ask for permission, I think they are just too lazy. Once you get permission, you can wait a moment, you’ll get candid shot later if you have patience. People who think they have a right to take picture in public spaces, please don’t get mad if someone point their 500 mm just 1 mm away from you nose..It’s public space, isn’t?

  23. In general I appreciate idea of asking first, but that defeats the whole idea of street photography. Instead of exposed emotions and interesting scenes you get people posing.
    Again, if you want privacy – get your own closed venue with your rules, don’t go to streets.

Leave a comment

Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE
%d bloggers like this: